I read it so you don’t have to: how the FLY handbook can help broke uni students.

Illustration by Sarah Cupitt.

Some books have the power to change lives; this is one of them.

“Much of FLY and the contents came about from our personal life and business experiences. Jai and I came from different backgrounds, careers and upbringings, we married young in our early 20’s, and as we approached our mid-thirties, we both felt there was plenty we wished we had learnt in our high schooling years about financial literacy and life skills. These could have seen us avoid many costly mistakes and stressful situations. Instead, we learnt things along the way, often through trial and error. Fortunately for us, Jai always had a passion for finance and has worked in the finance industry for over 17 years, and his knowledge helped us immensely throughout our journey.”

The book incorporates a range of essential topics: earning money, tax, budgeting, tertiary study, credit record, significant purchases, property, investments, and more. What I especially admire about the guide is that not only does it run through the basics, it explains their importance and branches into the niche of finance topics such as degree fee structures, micro-investing, and how to make a will. And if you want to plan and protect your financial future — it runs through financial hardship, how to start your own business, and lifelong goal setting.

Half of all Australians struggle with financial literacy.

“No matter what career you end up in, everyone needs a basic knowledge in financial literacy to ensure they make the most of opportunities, avoid costly pitfalls and set themselves up for their best possible future.”

“I studied accounting at high school and went on to include two years of Commerce as part of my law degree. Jai has been a mortgage broker since he was 19. Despite our financial educations and extensive experience in our careers and businesses, neither of us felt we received a well-rounded financial education at the optimal time in our life (i.e. in high school) to help us with life’s important financial decisions and milestones.”

But isn’t all this information online?

“During our brainstorming sessions in the early stages of FLY, we tracked back over our journeys and agreed on a logical sequence of financial milestones and helpful information that we felt should be covered in FLY. We wanted it to be comprehensive and all-encompassing, a one-stop reference guide in financial literacy. The information was a compilation of knowledge and research from Jai, myself and editor Cassandra Charlesworth, brought together in one credible and heavily referenced financial literacy handbook.”

There is so much potential for this guide to help young adults. So much more than maths in high school, learning how to manage a mobile contract and buy your first car. I want to note that all my notes, compared to the FLY handbook — didn’t measure up to a chapter of knowledge. I had barely scraped the surface.

“We can’t define it any better, and we hope FLY is the perfect handbook to deliver this set of skills and knowledge to allow our youth to make informed and effective decisions with all of their financial resources, at a time in their life when it will make the biggest impact on their futures.”

Seven exclusive tips from Marlies herself!

  1. Prioritise your financial literacy education to be empowered and seize opportunities and avoid costly mistakes
  2. 50/30/20 rule: Spend — 50% on needs, 30% on wants, and save 20%
  3. Understand compound interest — how it can work for and against you
  4. Avoid credit traps that could jeopardise your future borrowing capacity/goals
  5. Limit personally borrowing money for depreciating assets: save and pay cash where possible to avoid hefty interest
  6. Don’t procrastinate with starting to invest: don’t overthink it, educate yourself, and start small. Whatever you do, just START!

To be successful, you need to want and embrace it.

Published: W’SUP News

Feminist journalist and writer advocating for social change. Poetry is my creative form of expression. https://theauthortoria.com/

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